Termite Barrier Types – What is the best fit for your property

There are more and more termite barrier types coming onto the market. So which one is the right fit for your home?

Termite Barrier Types can really be categorised in three main types of termite protection.

  • Chemical Barrier
  • Reticulation System
  • Termite Baiting System

While the manufactures might be different, these are the fundamental designs they all come from.

Chemical Barrier

A chemical barrier is when a trench is dug down to the footings. Where accessible this trench will go all around the dwelling. If there are obstructions like pavers, concrete paths etc. These can either be removed, concrete cut through or drill out (to inject the chemical through). Depending on the quality of the soil it is then drenched with a termicide. Poor quality soil is replaced with rich organic garden soil. As more soil is added to fill up the trench is it saturated again in termicide.

Reticulation System

A reticulation system is similar to the above barrier type except a pipe is laid at the bottom of the trench. Like an irrigation pipe it has been design to take high pressure termicide and disperse it evenly through tiny holes. The trench is back filled and drench as per the above barrier. This is a great termite barrier as it can be recharged when needed. There are taps every 10 to 12 metres where the Pest Controller and plug in his pump. The cost to recharge the barrier is a fraction of the installation price.

Baiting System

A Termite Baiting System is the less invasive of all three termite barrier types. A cone shaped cylinder approximately 30cm long and 15cm wide is dug into the ground. These are installed every 3 metres. At the top is an inspection cap. The stations are filled with sleeves of eucalyptus timber. A monitoring schedule is created with a pest controller inspecting the stations every 6 to 10 weeks. When activity is found, a termicide is added to the station for the termites to eat.

More information can be found on our Termite Barrier Page.

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